Silence is Golden: When to Invoke Your Right to Remain Silent

The Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution includes a clause that protects individuals from being compelled to incriminate themselves in criminal matters. Similarly, the 1966 Supreme Court decision in Miranda v. Arizona established the so-called “Miranda rights” or “Miranda warning,” in which a person who is under arrest must be notified of their right to remain silent and right to consult with an attorney.

In this post, the Denver criminal defense lawyers at Wolf Law take a closer look at protections against self-incrimination and discuss when and why to invoke your right to remain silent.

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Take Misdemeanors Seriously: Talk with a Criminal Defense Lawyer

Misdemeanor charges are considered more serious than petty offenses, but less serious than felonies.

Although the penalties for misdemeanors can include jail time and extensive fines, many people assume that misdemeanor charges aren’t worth fighting and that they won’t lead to life-changing consequences. In this post, the Denver criminal defense lawyers at Wolf Law take a closer look at misdemeanors, explain why they should be taken seriously, and discuss the advantages of working with an experienced defense attorney.

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Denver Criminal Defense Lawyer Kelley Special Guest for NARSOL in Action

Wolf Law is proud to announce that our own Colleen Kelley will be the special guest for a NARSOL in Action conference call on Wednesday, Aug. 15. NARSOL is the National Association for Rational Sexual Offense Laws, an organization concerned with the post-conviction treatment of those convicted of sexual offenses. Continue reading “Denver Criminal Defense Lawyer Kelley Special Guest for NARSOL in Action”


What’s the Difference Between Probable Cause and Reasonable Suspicion?

Reasonable suspicion and probable cause are two concepts that law enforcement employs when determining whether to detain someone for questioning, search for and seize evidence, or make an arrest.

The standards for reasonable suspicion and probable cause were established by the U.S. Supreme Court, and while these concepts share similarities, they are also distinguished by some key differences. Following, the Denver criminal defense attorneys at Wolf Law discuss when and how reasonable suspicion and probable cause may be applied. Continue reading “What’s the Difference Between Probable Cause and Reasonable Suspicion?”